Friday, January 31, 2020

Italian Wine Cooperatives with Prosecco from Val d'Oca #ItalianFWT

Cooperatives are typically not one’s first choice when it comes to picking quality wine.  If you’re unfamiliar with the term, wine cooperatives are made of up individual owners of vineyards that grow grapes and collaborate to produce wines together.  There are for sure additional benefits, but as you can imagine it makes the production of wine easier for many of these small growers sharing a production facility, being able to invest in technology to better the quality produced, being able to market and promote their wines on a larger scale and maybe investing in the assistance of experienced enologists. 

In Italy wine cooperatives are very common.  Our host, Kevin of Snarky Wine, for our Italian Food, Wine & Travel group this month shares some shocking facts introducing our theme.  About 50% of the country’s wine is derived from cooperatives.  If that doesn’t leave you intrigued read on to discover what role Val d’Oca plays in the production of Prosecco in the Veneto wine region. 

The Winery ~ Val d’Oca 
Located in the Prealps of the Treviso area between the towns of Conegliano and Asolo is the Val d’Oca Consortium.   Established back in 1952 the coop has grown to almost 600 growers on about 2,000 acres.  They’re part of the Cantina Produttori di Valdobbiadene Cooperative and are stated to be the largest and oldest producers of Prosecco.  The grapes are grown in both the Treviso area as well as the more reknowned Valdobbiadene Conegliano known for it’s quality prosecco. The Valdobbiadene Conegliano area was promoted to the DOCG designation back in 2009.

The Wines 
Ninety percent of the Val d’Oca’s production is from the glera grape, the main grape used in prosecco.  It’s no surprise then that Prosecco is their pride and joy and I sampled a number of different styles to share with you. 

Val d’Oca Prosecco DOC Extra Dry – Made of 85% glera with 15% pinot grigio and chardonnay in the charmat/martinotti method.  A brilliant, straw color with aromas of lemon, florals and apple.  Crisp with mouthwatering, bright acidity up front.  Dry, citrus with a tingly sensation of bubbles on the finish that soften.  ABV 11% 

2018 Val d’Oca Millesimato Valdobbiadene Superiore DOCG Extra Dry – Made of the same blend of 85% glera with 15% pinot grigio and chardonnay in the charmat/martinotti method.  A crystal, pale yellow color in the glass.  Showing more florally aromatics towards peach and apple.  Dry with citrus, but I found these bubbles to be more elegant than the prior bottle.  SRP $18. SRP 11% 

Val d’Oca Rose’ Extra Dry – Made of both red and white grapes in the charmat/martinotti method.  This wine showed beautiful pale pink hues.  Fresh raspberries on the nose.  A fresh, enjoyable prosecco with raspberries and strawberries dancing on the palette.  ABV 11% 

Val d’Oca Valdobbiadene Superiore Rive di San Pietro di Barbozza DOCG  Brut Made of glera grapes sourced from a small appellation within the hill town of San Pietro di Barbozza.  The term rive signifies the steep slopes in which the grapes are grown.   43 rive exist within the Valdobbiadene and are of higher quality showing particular characteristics reflecting the terroir of each.  The most elegant of all with a beautiful finesse to the bubbles and enticing florals on both the nose and palette.  
Val d'Oca Prosecco Italian Wine Cooperatives
Read on because there are plenty more wine cooperatives of Italy to discover.  Catch us live on Twitter this Saturday at 11am @ #ItalianFWT.
 

Importer: Prestige Wine Imports and compliments of Susannah at Vigneto Communications   

*These wines were provided as samples, but opinions are my own.

8 comments:

  1. I was happy to receive these samples from VAl D'Oca, having enjoyed wines from this area in the past.

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  2. The 100% Glera wins here! It would be interesting to taste the three white blind to see if we could ID it. Maybe someday.

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  3. These sound like a great line up, particularly perhaps the Rive.

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  4. Very cool that you got a Rive wine. I've had lots of Prosecco Superiore, but haven't tried a Rive wine yet.

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  5. Jennifer-
    Nice round-up of the wines. I agree many people, including me, didn't know the breath and depth of cooperative cellars in Italy. Cheers, Susannah

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  6. Jennifer-
    Nice round-up of the wines. I agree many people, including me, didn't know the breath and depth of cooperative cellars in Italy. Cheers, Susannah

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  7. Jennifer-
    I liked your round up on the wines and the winery and agree that most people, myself included, don't know the breadth and depth of cooperatives in Italy. Cheers, Susannah

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  8. I was also surprised to learn that there are so many wine cooperatives in Italy. Nice tasting notes and the Val d'Oca wines are truly a great value!

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